Bumpy Rogue: How to get off the path of wasting money

No one is going to argue that saving money isn’t hard. But does it really have to be perceived as next to impossible?

The fact remains is that debt is a real issue, one that isn’t going away any time soon, and you can look at the cruel, crude numbers of the average amount of debt (unsecured) at around $25,000 and also pay close attention to the average amount of money a person keeps in their savings account, around a paltry $1,000.

That is a huge disconnect and distance between those two figures, and with that, you can see why people assume that saving money is a dream, and nothing more.

But the fact remains is that you can break away from that mentality if you avoid some simple ways that you’re wasting money. Even more, you might not even realize that you’re doing it.

The most obvious is two fold: you don’t have a budget and you’re living beyond your means. Those two go hand in hand with one another, good or bad. If you’re having trouble saving money, chances are both of these things are working against you. And, for example, if you have a budget and it’s iron clad (more on that in a minute), you still can overspend or live well beyond your means, which essentially renders your budget useless.

As for the budgeting process, you can’t just focus on the obvious. You have to take into consideration little elements of spending, such as a gym membership or a simple bottle of water every day for 365 days of the year. The small, so called inconsequential things add up quickly and can’t be overlooked.

Another huge missteps when it comes to why you can’t save money is a propensity to ignore your income and only add expenses as you go through life. Successful people who pay attention to money know that they’ll always continue to look for ways to earn more, even if you’re going to be a part time driver or work from home as a typist. They’ll always try to sell things they aren’t using or look for ways to save any way they can, whether that is their cable television bill or cell phone plan. Those individuals don’t add expenses; they find a way to minimize them and work that total number spent down.

Being successful at saving money does take work, but you can argue just how hard it is. The word “hard” should be replaced with attention to detail as the driving force behind financial prosperity.

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